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administration to create the electric vehicle infrastructure for the city and began the conversation and the collaboration with the other counties to bring an electric vehicle corridor. it signals our efforts to support the creation of infrastructure to the electric vehicle industry. of course we have encouraged the private automobile creators to join us. today is a wonderful opportunity to do that with a bmw. any of you who noticed the labels in this city, you will certainly noticed the popularity of bmw as a corporation, not only a great company but one that is also on the cutting edge of the use of technology. i want to thank them and welcome them to not only the electric vehicle stage, which they have been working on, but also to this great program they are about to introduce, the drive now and park now technology. joined -- joining us in the car sharing program for their members who want to use bmw products. this idea of cars sharing has been a part of san francisco's objective in creating a more sharing economy. like many other cities, we are congested in our parking. parking i
dina hillard. i am the chair of the citizen's advisory committee that works with the city administrator office, city administrator on these community benefit agreements and zen dusk was our first company that we worked with and they're actually in their second year of the cba but they were really easy to work with. they were very enthusiastic providing benefits to the neighborhood. they were very forth coming with any information we asked for and definitely a model for the other companies and in our conversations with the other companies we told them talk to zen dusk. they were amazing to work with, and i think for me what is unique about zen dusk is that there is a culture. you can tell there say culture in the company that desires to really integrate and be part of the community and provide benefits to the community, and it's not out of having to sign a cba, but it just really is evident to me it's part of the culture, their company, to want to provide the benefits to the neighborhood they're in, so i personally want to thank sen dusk. i hope any companies that come
. city college of san francisco has 9 campuses in the city and serves approximately 100,000 students each year. the state has reduced funding to ccsf by core academic courses, provide work force training, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city colleg
proud of this kind of public-private partnership to move the city forward. now join me in welcoming the city's first asian american mayor and i'm very proud to say a member of the lee tribe, the 43rd mayor of san francisco, ed lee. (applause). >> thank you, judy, very much for that introduction. good morning, everyone. >> good morning. >> it's great to be here at the san francisco chamber and of course the center for economic development here, your breakfast for 2012, it's my pleasure to be here. i walked in as ed from wells fargo was talking and i just wanted to make sure you knew, i am eternally grateful it the chamber, to wells fargo for helping me create 5,200 jobs for our kids. that's a wonderful accomplishment. i've been your mayor for almost two years now and everybody is coming up to me and asking, are you enjoying it? you know, some of the politics in the city it's hard to enjoy but i will say honestly to steve fox, to the chamber and judy and all of you working together to keep our city successful, i do enjoy creating jobs. and when you see our youth get those paid in
sharing economy. like many other cities, we are congested in our parking. parking is really a challenge in the city. for people who own vehicles, and introducing people to car- sharing programs and ideas have been a wonderful experiment for us. as you know, we have been working to create not only public garages but also in congested neighborhoods. when a private company like bmw registers their interest in car- sharing, that is a complement to the direction we are heading to be morris -- more sustainable. i want to think bmw for being here. we are in negotiations to get us into our fleet so we can utilize. unless we do it with the latest technology, people will not appreciate the mayor driving a bmw. [laughter] but we are doing it for the right reasons. i want to showcase that as we lead this country into a thought process, a challenge that our major cities, our urban settings can have solutions to our parking problems, have sustainable mobility as part of our alternatives in the vehicles and car-sharing as a principle for us to join our automobile makers as well as our vehicle owners a
know, some of the politics in the city it's hard to enjoy but i will say honestly to steve fox, to the chamber and judy and all of you working together to keep our city successful, i do enjoy creating jobs. and when you see our youth get those paid internships or get that summer job at a number of all of your or starbucks, even, or the jamba juice and all the others and the nonprofits as well as our city departments and you see the gleam in their eye that they can really be part of this community in san francisco, that's something i really do enjoy and i will continue enjoying that for this whole 4 years term, even though i will avoid all the politics as much as i can. but i want to begin by saying that since i started, as judy mentioned earlier, san francisco businesses have created 22,500 jobs as my start, including 13,000 new jobs in technology and industry alone. unemployment dropped from 9.6 when i started to 7.4 percent, third lowest in the state, and i said in other jurisdictions, i'll say it again, i think we contribute to marin and san mateo because we buy all the wi
neighborhoods in the city. we have enjoyed a very lucky vote past november where our paving and streets -- that will produce $240 million of anchor for our streets repaving but also for infrastructure in our streets that allow you need to move faster, less congested, our curb ramps for persons with disabilities, a number of street park with that will be had. bike lanes that will allow our bikers -- a lot of them want to be able to have dedicated green lanes. all of that has anchored into a very strong vote, one that was very difficult to pass because it required 2/3, and we were able to do that. very fortunate in our city to be able to have that. and, of course, improving our public transportation. muni continues to be a challenge because of its infrastructure and its debts, and we will continue paying attention to that, and that is why we have got to be always investing in our future, and transportation is a huge part of that, but we have been very successful in gaining federal grants for that in the past, but also making sure we can build infrastructures like the central subway that a
being evicted out of the city of san francisco in terms of the laws that they lay, what they're, the arrogance of their position. when you have the residents go before them because they are not being, they are not under the eye of observation. then you really see the bad side of why you need to bring this organization to the light where they could be observed. i think it's a good thing but by the same, we need it done like 25 years ago. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is [inaudible] ladies and gentlemen. the history goes back to 25 years ago to the housing authority and my statement i have been using at your commission for years, ain't no mystery, check your history. ladies and gentlemen, there's deeper history in what we're talking about with the city government channel. i'm the one that started that, i'm not going to get the hand for that because of same things the housing authority tenants went through 20 years ago. ladies and gentlemen, i am happy, tickled not pink by black right now because most of the tenants are african-americans. i stand
pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [applause] >> thank you. can everyone here me? welcome to spur. i enjoy being here because every time i come here, some part of my brain wakes up that has not been woken up before. i am here to welcome you. earlier, i had a wonderful opportunity to exchange with our panel members about what they are doing and how they're doing it. . i think these panel members are here as part of their own entrepreneurial spirit. they own companies but love the city. they know the spirit of the city is one of innovation, that invites peoples and views, and smashes them -- meshes them together to see if we can make an even better san francisco. we have two other supervisors who may be coming later. we're all part of the initial group of policymakers at city hall who want to hear news views and ideas on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects that have piqued our interest, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make
at it, we're putting in place an awful lot of things that shape what our city looks like in the future, how our city operates, how we interact with our city. as i started to think about that, i thought, you know, the number of major infrastructure projects going on in our immediate region now are probably -- there are probably more dollars and energy going into that than any time since bart was put through the city. you have the eastern span of the bay bridge. you have the transbay terminal. you have the central subway project. you have the improvement realignment of doyle drive. all of these things are part of the hard wiring of our city that is going to influence the way in which we all interact with it. over the last, say, five to ten years, we have watched as development and interest and people have moved south of market, into mission bay, below that we now that is continuing and we now have projects on the table like the pier 70 project, which ten years ago no one would have thought was a viable mixed-use project, because nobody went there. and that part of it is no longer true.
improving and cleaning up toxic pollution along the city's eastern waterfront and a wide array of positive vital investments in our park system to help maintain that no. 1 rating for us and for future generations. >> thank you, gentlemen. we hope that this discussion was informative. for more information on this and other ballot measures in this year's election, please visit the san francisco league of women voters vote at sfvotes.org. remember, early voting is available at city hall monday through friday from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm if you don't vote early, be sure to hi, i'm jay konig, a member of the league of women voters. along with the league and sf gov tv, i'm here to discuss proposition c the city currently uses federal, state and local funds to support affordable housing programs for both low income and moderate income households. recent federal cutbacks and reductions in state funding have decreased the funding available for affordable housing programs. proposition c would amend the charter to establish a housing trust fund. the city would contribute $20 million dollar
we have an affordable sector in this city. when it comes it recreating redevelopment, that's a fallacy. it's about recognizing that redevelopment allowed a certain portion of money to be used for redevelopment. it's not about recreating redevelopment, in fact that's a closed chapter in history. lastly the idea we are reducing the mixed income housing is also a sort of fallacy. there is a purpose to providing an incentive for developers to do what's called mixed income housing, providing some of their units are affordable to mixed income households. most developers do not do that and this is an incentive for them to do it. this is providing a set of programs that are funded providing all the way for folks who were formerly homeless to folks who are middle income to be and stay in san francisco. >> any final comments, starchild. >> it sounds like peter is saying on one hand, well, no, it won't subsidize middle income people then he's saying there is a range all the way from middle income people all the way up to -- he doesn't say what the top range is. there's a guy name
. scoot isn't just a better way to get around the city, when we started scoot, we believed that giving people an alternative to driving could have huge benefits for the local and global environment, we're dieted that mel knee muter, the director of the san francisco department of the environment is here with us in our opening of public beta in san francisco. >> good morning, everyone, it is an honor to be here for scoot's public announcement. this really does have great promise for helping to reduce carbon emissions in the city and county of san francisco. as some of you may know, about 40% of our carbon emissions in the city come from cars and trucks so we need to find alternatives for getting people out of their fossil fuel powered cars, this is going to be a great option for residences and businesses in san francisco to find an al -- an tern t*if, we're rolling out the electric vehicle infrastructure for cars so this is another electric vehicle option that we're happy to support. we also implement the commuter benefits program and help employers provide options to their employees f
technology company, they've got investor confidence in our city. we're also creating investor confidence because we have in working closely with our controller and all the other financial organizations of our city and all of our departments, we're now on a more financially stable responsible path. we've done our pension reform, it's not 100 percent, we've gt a big chunk of it down and we're going to continue doing the smart things to make sure that pension is solid. and we've got structural reforms in our budget as well. we passed our first two-year budget. that's a wonderful accomplishment, one that i'm interested in to continue it make sure we plan for the long-term. and we're not going to rest on today's success. this is just a beginning and you know this is just my first year, 4 years, and i'm going gang busters on our financial economy, stablization and financial ideas because that's what we have to do first, is have a good economic foundation in which to grow. for the first time in years you've seen a lot of unity move around this city between business and labor, between the l
cities are strong, now with this new agreement, we assure they will continue and remain strong nd beneficial for the great cities of paris and san francisco. [applause]. >> do you think he interpreted himself well? so, you can see why he is our chairman, now the moment has come, mayors, to sign the memorandum of understanding. yes, sign it. [applause]. (next event). >> i tried to think about this room as the dream room, where we dream and bring some of those dreams to life. i feel very blessed that i have been able to spend the last 31 years of my life doing it my way, thinking about things better interesting to me, and then pursuing them. there are a lot of different artists that come here to work, mostly doing aerial work. kindred spirits, so to speak. there is a circus company that i have been fortunate enough to work with the last couple of years. i use elements of dance and choreography and combine that with theater techniques. a lot of the work is content- based, has a strong narrative. the dancers have more of a theatrical feel. i think we are best known for our specific wo
city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined the provision party. a deadly idea in san francisco. liquor was the foundation of the economy. and >> anything that touched on the possibility of prohibition was greatly and popular. >> the first campaign was a great effort, but not a success. >> the war was not over. less than one decade later, a graphic protests brought new life to the movement. >> women's suffrage, the republican convention in oakland, this time it was the private sector response. 300 marched down the streets of the convention center. women were entitled to be here. >> joining together for another campaign. >> women opened a club in san francisco. it was called the votes for women club. if she could get the shopkeepers to have lunch, she could get them to be heard literature. the lunch room was a tremendous success. >> it was the way that people thought about women willing to fight for a successful campaign. what happened was, the social transformation increase the boundar
parks to health care to education. this measure would get san francisco city government into the business of making home loans. this is part of what brought on the economic crisis at the federal level, fannie mae and freddie mac giving out home loans to people who couldn't afford to buy and later had their houses foreclosed. we don't know what's going to happen in the housing market for the next 30 years. i think it's foolish to set aside increasing set amounts of money for the next 3 decades when we know right now that there's thousands of people living on the streets. why not just build as many affordable units now as possible and do that by getting government out of the way with all its red tape and regulations and taxes and union work rules that increase the cost of housing. that would be a better way to get affordable housing, not bringing back this redevelopment agency with its legacy of driving african americans out of the fillmore and they had slated more than half the bay area for redevelopment before they were shut down. >> anything you'd like to add, peter?
thoughts on the city's economic development? are we on the right track? what would you like to change about the city's approach to developing economies? >> in the chair of the land use committee this year, and i was vice chair last year with our former chair from the bayview hunters point area. i guess i approach land use and economic development from a different perspective. i'm not against development, but i want it to be equitable so we look at the lowest income populations or even middle income populations so that residents have a strong say as development moves forward, whether it is the park ridge said development in the southern, western part of the city or even treasure island with there's many low-income families that currently live there. but it is a strong voice for the residents that currently are there. we also want to see new people moving into the city, and hopefully, we focus also on families and housing that provides better homes and home opportunities for families, but i always say that i support equitable development. i also do feel that big business and downtown interest
leaders in the business community including and particularly small business advocates around the city to make sure this was carefully crafted. so i really do hope voters will support this consensus measure with proposition e because it's good measure for jobs, it's a good measure for our city, it's a good measure to make sure san francisco continues to inknow 78 and continue to employ all san franciscoans. >> starchild, how would you like to conclude? >> again, when you hear bi-partisan compromise at city hall, hold on to your walts as the saying goes. obviously the libertarian party didn't have a seat at the table and i don't feel like tax opponents in general -- proponents of people keeping more of their money they earn really had a seat at the table with this. mayor lee's initial proposal wasn't bad. he wanted to make it revenue neutral but the measure got modified through the back door dealing, things got changed and we round up with a revenue non-neutral measure. again, payroll tax is bad. i'm all for getting rid of it. everything else being equal, i'm sure it would result in m
. it is about 9.6% right now, and the fact that we have not done much about that in city hall i think is about to change. that is certainly something i will be focused on, putting people back to work. it is an individual issue, but it is a family issue, and we have a lot of families still struggling, and a think people have lost sight of that. hopefully, we will be getting out of this recession soon, but we need to do a lot in city hall to accelerate getting out of the recession, making sure families are back at work, making sure children are provided for. that is my biggest priority. >> talk about the issues facing your district specifically and how you are going to balance the issues facing the city at large against those in your district. >> we definitely have a few big projects for issues -- or issues we're paying a lot of attention to and we will continue to devote a lot of attention to, both myself and my staff. one of biggest ones is the planned development of the new campus for california and pacific medical center. that has dominated a lot of city-wide dialogue in the past few years.
for the people back to city hall. i ask you to vote for me, hope johnson, this november and i thank you for your time. >> my name is kristine olague is i am the current incumbent for district five. this includes the fillmore, western addition, cathedral hill, japan town, lower pacific heights, lower and upper hate, nopa and coal valley and the neighbors. i am running to serve a full term on the board of supervisors, representing district five because i have long worked to make local government work better for the needs of the neighborhood residents. all that you have to do is look at how i have spent my entire professional life. i have the most robust record of achievements in shaping local public policy of any candidate running for district five supervisor. my father was born in mexico and worked as a mechanic fixing the farm equipment in the central valley. some of my childhood memory ss watching laborers work for little or no compensation at a young age based on what i witnessed i developed a understanding of economic injustice. growing up in the 60s my life experience has shaped my activism
's understand what the issue is and what other jurisdictions have done. to me this is acting responsible as city government and solving issues before they reach crisis levels and protecting future generations. thank you supervisor wiener for your support. >> thank you, mr. president that concludes roll call for introductions. >> i would be happy to be included on that item. >> the next item is the opportunity for the public to address the board for two minutes on items. please note that public comment is not allowed on items that have already been subject to public comment by a board committee. speakers using translation assistance will be allowed twice the time to testimony. and if a member would like to have a document, et cetera. [speaker not understood] ladies and gentlemen, after 28 years i'm here in this place. i have the courage to ask our president and our -- [speaker not understood] for ten months we have no sheriff. i would like to ask you to come with me to give honor to those who died for our country. the third one, which i made a mistake now. i would like to tell to our sheriff
that the recovery and the economic prosperity reaches every neighborhood in our city. technology is not only bringing jobs to san francisco, but it's bringing new solutions to our government. we're embracing the use of technology and to enhance our performance, to measure our performances, to increase transparency and communications with our constituents and to transform our relationships with business and residents. many of you in this room already know how hard it is and how difficult it is to start a business in our city. business owners have to navigate through multiple city departments, state and federal regulations, so now we're deploying technology to streamline this process. we're going to make it easier with a one stop shop to make sure our san francisco businesses can start here, stay here and grow here. innovation is at the forefront. let me mention a special area of innovation that's going on, what i call the silent giant in san francisco. you'll have in front of you this study. it is entitled from our council the world-leading center for health care and research that's pro
francisco has the greatest and most vibrant nightlife of any major city in the country. i want to thank my colleague scott wiener for helping to showcase the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be
. what's unfortunate about all those is the city of san francisco has boycotted participating in those studies. san francisco says, wait a minute we have a unique responsibility here. we're the only city that stores our water in a national park so let's see how we can do better because we don't do a very good job. orange county recycles 30 million gallons of water a day, we recycle zero. we have a great opportunity to guarantee our water future and undo the damage to yosemite national park. >> sean, one point i know is the hydroelectric power generated by that dam, if i remember it's 41 million dollars? do i have my numbers right? >> there are a number of reasons why hetch hetchy is such a benefit to the city, not the least of which is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall
to the city, not the least of which is that it produces carbon free public power to the city of san francisco. one of my favorite lines mike just used is this measure is about consolidating from 8 reservoirs to 7. another way to say that is to say this is about draining one of them, the hetch hetchy valley. have other studies said this is feasible? sure, just like tearing down city hall or knocking down the golden gate bridge, that's possible but not feasible. we're not going to spend 3 billion dollars to tear down the hetch hetchy dam. let's not forget, we are also stewards for two dozen cities in the peninsula. over 2 million californians benefit from the foresight of our forefathers almost 100 years ago in building hetch hetchy. while the rest of the state is tying themselves up in knots trying to figure out where to get their water. not only did we have the type of water storage hetch hetchy provides, not only today but in the future, we are in a solid place. and to spend this kind of money, and let's just talk about the $8 million dollars, i think that's one thing we can agree on.
and resilience every day. i wanted to take a moment to detail how san francisco is a sustainable seven -- city. being a sustainable city means we are less wasteful. we are leading the nation with over 78% diversion rate. 70% of our waste is recycled, compost, or diverted. being a sustainable city, we are energy-efficient. our energy program is a partnership that we have put together with pg&e and we help small businesses save money on energy bills and reduce carbon emissions. in san francisco, we are also renewable the powered. we have about 3000 solar installations throughout the city and county of san francisco, equalling 19 megawatts of solar. we are also working toward being 100% powered city in the next 10 years. finally, in san francisco, it means we are ev ready. we're making it easier for residents to take charge of their electric cars. the city now operates 50 publicly available charging stations at 15 locations. these are found at city parking garages, at the airport, treasure island, and by the end of 2012, the city will add another 30-40 charges. of note, the public uses the statio
keep a city or any government frasa:@r protectinge health of their people. we cannot regulate the health of our people because of a federal regulation. that's ridiculous. in fact, the federal regulation is much, much more narrow than that. the second thing is the at&t argument that the issue that they're worried about is tissue warming. it's a very typical thing in industry for the industry to throw out a kind of red herring that throws you off track. the one thing we know about microwaves from experience is it does not generally warm things. the effect on the body is much more precise than that. and it really is out of respect that this body did the right thing tonight that i'm bringing that to your attention tonight. >> president chiu: are there any other speakers? please step up. >> good evening, supervisors. what a night. i feel relieved but not in any way jubilant. i wanted to give you some comment about public comment. i've stood in these chambers a number of times and watched certain supervisors chastise members of the public for how they've given their public comment a
, as an attorney (inaudible). of course, i litigated against the city for some years and got convinced that maybe that does not end up in all of the best results. so i got enticed by (inaudible) to start working in it and... required the people in the city government who wanted to do better but simply did not know how. the passion was there. the passion from our communities have been there for many, many years. and so, fast forward 20 years later i am the mayor of this crazy place and i tried... (inaudible). and i think the great way of doing that is to model new ways to an old passion and as people who want to solve problems and people who have passion to get other people involved in the community and government and people who have a passion to help others. people who have the passion to pledge the welfare of the city ahead of their own success. that is what i want to see happen in government. and so, a lot of it is called innovations because, guess what? i learned very quickly, from years of working with christene and others, innovation is not just about technology, it is about a spirit of bein
ask reduces traffic congestion in cities where we're deployed and save users money. the big difference with our program and other programs is the ability to do a one-way trip as was previously mentioned and it doesn't require an advance reservation and you have the vehicle for as long as you need it. and you can park the vehicle in any legal on-street parking place. doesn't have to be assigned. currently we object rate in san diego, washington, d.c., portland, austin, miami, and all of our users have the same experience. they find the cars on their app generally and they get the car for as long as they need it. in the cities that we operate, we define a home area as how the system works. this is just a picture of the d.c. home area on the left and a distribution of cars on the right. so, as you can see the cars are evenly distributed throughout the area and it's not because we put the cars there. it's because the members put them there. for san francisco, we envision a program where we would deploy up to 450 cars at least throughout the city and in the month before launch, we would pro
mean more people voting for city attorney and treasurer and if that's not democracy, i don't know what is. there's a reason why this is getting such broad support and i think it deserves the voters' support. >> thank you. and dr. faulkner, would you please summarize why you believe people should be voting against this measure? >> originally it was all odd year elections for city government. the main focus was to have a lot of elections spread out so people would pay attention. that was the idea of the 1932 charter. it is good in the sense given the history of san francisco and, frankly, a lot of governmental problems we had historically, getting people to pay attention to city government has been very important. we had 1901 to 1907 a group called roof ring, they described the 18 supervisors then on the board as, quote, so corrupt they would eat the paint off the walls. that's the reason why we want people to pay attention to their city government. frankly, new england city governments are the small ones and tall hall government is the best of all. we can't do that. but we
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 357 (some duplicates have been removed)